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Galerie Q Blog

Galerie Q Blog is dedicated to sharing and inspiring those interested in Art with the latest in news and opinions in regard to Canadian art scene. Galerie Q Blog is a venue for connecting and informing all parties involved in Arts including, artists, art collectors, art dealers, art auction houses and private and public galleries of Galerie Q's event and exhibition updates.

A Spiritual Journey : Gaston Petit

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 New to Q's collection is French-Canadian painter Father Gaston Petit who is a Dominican priest from Shawinigan, Quebec. Since 1966, Petit has been stationed in Tokyo, Japan, where he practices as a painter, a sculptor, a printmaker, and a stained glass designer. While not having set out to become an artist, it was through his studies and exposure to theology and philosophy that Petit found his creative self.

After demonstrating his extraordinary skill in the design and ornamentation of several chapels and churches in Japan, Petit was given permission by the Clergy to devote himself to sacred art. With no formal artistic training, he was sent to Europe to study the many exquisite churches of France, Germany, and Belgium. He also took advantage of visits to Cambodia, Thailand, India, Afghanistan, and Iran to soak in the Eastern and Middle Eastern cultures.

Petit’s personal artistic practice evolved from his vocation to build places of worship. His cross-cultural experiences play a prominent role in his work, which he sees as a way to explore the concept of being and its relationship with divinity. Nourished by the evocation of religious symbols, both spiritual and philosophical, Petit mixes references from his Catholic priesthood, as well as elements of Taoist, Buddhist, and Hindu religions. Although his stylistic influences fall within fauvism and surrealism, Petit's own approach to art is a medieval one, in which art serves as part of ritual rather than for static viewing.

As an artist, Petit says “Conscious of it or not, an artist is pushed by the desire to leave something to humanity,” but as a priest he adds “The true artist aims at participating, by analogy, in God’s power of creation. He dresses himself in the Creator’s vestments. 

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CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL IN CAVAN/MILLBROOK

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Our Christmas Festival Schedule is now Live!

It's the most wonderful time of the year and we want you to join us for 12 days of Holiday Cheer. Looking for old-fashioned Christmas celebrations outside the major cities? We have you covered. With tree-lightings, Santa arrivals, Hot Cider, Live Music, Choirs & painting Demo’s, local honey, Maple syrup & Chocolate for sale.

The Arts community of Cavan/Millbrook are partnering to bring you a Christmas Festival to remember. Galerie Q together with two local art galleries, Cavan Arts and Millbrook Gallery are presenting a series of 12 events for 12 days at each gallery.

There is a brand new abstract show and sale called Emotions by Arlene Koszorek at Cavan Arts that are the Hottest, Newest contemporary pieces to date. Holiday Gift cards have arrived at Galerie Q just in time for the holidays as well as a New Winter exhibition showcasing astonishing winter vistas rich with dramatic colour and form. And finally, The Millbrook Gallery, who will have its grand opening and exhibit its prized artists in the collection. All the galleries have wonderful artwork to see and own for your home, business or give the gift of art.

 

 

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From War art to Still Life: Frederick Bourchier Taylor

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We are excited to acquire prominent artist Frederick Bourchier Taylor’s (1906–1987) budding still life at Galerie Q.

As a man with a myriad of talent and interest, Taylor spent much of his early years in Ottawa where he studied architecture and developed an interest in skiing and boxing. It was only after graduating in 1930, that Taylor started to pursue his passion for the arts. After finally settling in Montreal in 1937, Taylor had managed to earn a living teaching drawing at the McGill School of Architecture.

In the early years of World War II, Taylor lobbied for an official war art program for those to address their experience post war, offering an authentic glimpse into the conditions and deep emotions attached to war on the body. While Taylor never fully achieved his dream of becoming an official war artist, he devoted himself for three years to paint the diverse, taxing, and often unrecognized or under-appreciated work done by Canada’s factory workers.

Taylor still continued to paint well after the war was over. He produced some exquisite still life and landscape paintings, exhibiting his works across Quebec and Ontario. In 1960, he moved to Mexico for a change of pace and tried his hand at sculpture. Taylor passed away in San Miguel de Allende Mexico on April 1987. New to the collection, Flowering Begonia Plant offers us a rare glimpse into Taylor’s sensitivity towards the tender elements of nature. Visit us today for your first hand look at this stunning Canadian artwork. 

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A Love of the Landscape: Goodridge Roberts

A Love of the Landscape: Goodridge Roberts

 

Goodridge Roberts RCA (1904–1974) painted a series of landscapes over many years that focused on a particular site in Southwestern Québec. Working outside, Roberts would express the changing environment with energetic brushwork and less contained shapes. His intentional departure from realism allowed Roberts a way of authentically representing the site, which he had studied and grown so fond of over the years. His treatment of these long-standing themes became a kind of analogy of painting rather than an archive of the sites he had painted.

"Must the artist, like the tight-rope walker in a dream-like state of composure, yet always aware of the gulf at his feet, feel both the elation and the uneasiness? One is made forcibly aware of the tension under which one has been working by the sense of relief with which one contemplates a work well done, or of extreme dejection before a badly realized work. There is no truce in this conflict until the brushes are laid down."

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Léo Ayotte: The Penniless Painter

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Léo Ayotte was a self-taught Quebec painter born in Sainte-Flore in 1909. Although poetry was Ayotte's first passion, his artistic resolve went far beyond the written word. In 1938, Ayotte moved to Montreal Sainte-Famille. With no money, he found himself work as a model and janitor at the École des beaux-arts de Montréal.

Although he had no formal art education, Ayotte was determined to create. After work, he would pick up the half-empty tubes left by careless students and use them to paint. Soon after, Ayotte was discovered by the school director, who saw one of his works and pronounced him as the best student in the school. Ayotte painted for over 30 years, often using just one brush and never returning to touch up a work once he had finished. A reflection of his poetry, Ayotte’s colourful landscapes are hymns to the beauty and joy he found in nature.

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R.C.A Armand Tatossian: Artist of the Century

R.C.A Armand Tatossian: Artist of the Century

 

Armand Tatossian (1951-2012), was a Canadian-Armenian artist who had the honour of being the youngest member ever accepted into the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts (RCA) in 1973. Born in Alexandria, Egypt, Tatossian was descended from a long line of artists. Some of his early teachers included his father, Charles Garo Tatossian, the Serbian sculptor Jose Majzner, as well as the respected portraitist and muralist Adam Sherriff-Scott. In 1970, he travelled to Paris to study under the famous French painters Jean Carzou, Bernard Buffet, and Jean Jansem.

Following the Academy des Beaux-Arts, Tatossian studied mural technique at the Carrara Academy in Italy. His artistic energy was largely expressed in oil on canvas paintings of varied subject matter, and featured the ever so distinctive style dubbed ‘Tatossianisme'. Tatossian's unique artistic style received international exposure through exhibitions and museum collections worldwide. See Armand's works on Exhibit Now

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Raynald Leclerc: Textured Landscapes

Raynald Leclerc: Textured Landscapes

Having grown up alongside the St. Lawrence River, Raynald Leclerc uses the picturesque scenes of the river as his source of inspiration in his paintings. What makes his scenes striking are his use of brilliant primary colours and textures to portray natural elements in his landscapes. He often captivates his viewers with the beautiful reflections of light on water as most impressionist painters have studied since the late 1800s to late 1900s. Leclerc is a self-taught artist, who first studied architecture at Levis-Lauzon CEGEP and then continued on to work as an industrial designer.

His style is multi-faceted with vibrant colour compositions. Leclerc mixes his colours strategically, directing our eyes to see the entirety of the picture plane with swift ridges guiding our senses along objects and natural landmarks.His whimsical apple and olive trees are reminiscent of the era of Monet and Van Gogh, but Leclerc revamps this style with a post-modern twist in his use of texture. In his portfolio, he is not afraid to paint every time of the day as sensual aesthetics of light and shadow embark on new journeys through his paintings. View our collection of Raynald Leclerc’s paintings at Galerie Q today. 

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Galerie Q presents, The Nation Builders Series

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150 years ago, Prime Minister, John A. MacDonald united New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the Province of Canada (Ontario & Quebec) to form the Canada of 1867. The Confederation of Canada became a pinnacle point in Canada’s history not for just the unity of the country, but it’s identity and independence to govern affairs aside from Britain’s sovereignty. This Canada Day, we will remember and celebrate the victories and milestones Canada has achieved as a country. It is this celebration that has sparked this two-year initiative of the Nation Builders Portrait Series that commemorates the honourable Prime Ministers and Nation Builders of Canada throughout its history.

The series features 12 paintings starting from Prime Minister, John A. MacDonald to Prime Minister, Brian Mulroney. With the help and talent of six Canadian portrait artists, Galerie Q is proud to announce the unveiling of the Nation Builder Series on Saturday, July 1, 2017 at 1 p.m. We will be featuring an artist talk by both portrait artists, Susan Statham and Olga Muzychko at 2 p.m. to uncover the hidden symbols and process of creating these honorary portraits of Canada’s Nation Builders. 

Galerie Q wishes everyone a Happy Canada Day long weekend.

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Ginet Leblond : Old & New

Ginet Leblond. Rivière aux Roches . Oil on Board. 34.5x43.75"

“Thinking, creating and telling a story is what I enjoyed doing. I imagine that I am there. I could be the man, woman or child that you see in my work. I enter their lives”

Ginet Leblond began art school at the age of nineteen under the guidance of Lauréanne Morneau. In addition to Morneau’s encouragement in school, Leblond received private oil instruction at artist residency La Maison Ste-Marie-des-Anges. Her training however was not limited to painting. She took sculpture lessons taught by J.P Garneau. After developing her knowledge of sculptural techniques along side Jean-Paul Garneau, Paul-André Bécotte and P.A. Tardivel, she was asked to represent female sculptors in a cast metal demonstration at St-Jean-Baptiste.

Leblond completed her Bachelor’s degree in 1987 at Laval University; after which she attended the Centre de Céramique of Sté-Foy from 1989-1990. She met her husband, Marc-André Fortin 1993, an antiquities connoisseur. Together they created works highlighting the natural beauty and potential of antiquities through refurbishing the old wood and painting unique images on the surface.

Although Leblond primarily works in the medium of painting, glimpses of her interest in sculptural techniques can be seen in her paintings today. In many of her works, the painting continues on to the frame which no longer acts as a "frame" in the traditional sense but dissolves the border between the painting and its frame.

Today, Leblond primarily works with on oil on board. Her paintings feature historical subject matter with contemporary relevance. We are captivated by Leblond's masterful rendering of the subject and time period. See her works on exhibit now at Galerie Q.

 

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Urban Flux

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Russian Canadian Olga Muzychko is hyperaware of her urban surroundings: soundscapes, sightscapes, urban flux. She sees. She hears. She absorbs. She adapts. “…the world of art is ever changing,” Muzychko observes. “There are…different experiences to react to. An artist must change as the world is changing.” Muzychko grew up in an artistic family on the coast of the Black Sea in Russian. Surrounded by literature, instruments and paintings, Muzychko developed her love for the arts.

Muzychko herself is in flux, either physically through travel or mentally through memory. She relives what she sees and hears through her paintings: people, landscapes, architecture. She began her art studies in Russia and continued her learning at the Toronto School of the Arts after moving to Canada. In combination with realistic principles that she developed in Russia, she draws her inspiration from her surroundings: “my teacher is nature itself—its beauty is everywhere.”

Beginning with a blank still surface, Muzychko relives her memories with paint, memories taken from everywhere’s beauty. Her work allows viewers to catch glimpses of stillness within pulsating moments of urban flux.

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Brunet's Zestful Skies

Brunet's Zestful Skies

Daniel Brunet was born in Sainte-Anne de Bellevue Quebéc, 1952. His father was a musician, his mother a craftswoman; both encouraged him to develop his artist creativity.During his childhood, Brunet learned the piano, organ, saxophone and clarinet. He often found himself drawing on his sheet music. Brunet later used these rough sketches as aids for his first attempts with oil paint. 

Today, Brunet works with oil paint on board or canvas. He captures the rural landscape of Charlevoix Québec in a recognizable style: his use of shadow and light render calm, backgrounds with glimpses of life. Subdued homes scattered across hillsides; zestful skies with whispes of cloud. 

Brunet has been exhibiting since 1988. Recently, his work has been showcased at Maison O’Connel, Centre cultural de Pierrefonds and Auberge de now Aïeux. In addition to exhibiting, Brunet hosts a biannual painting workshop in Charlevoix.  

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The Mysticism of Bonet

The Mysticism of Bonet

 

Laurent Bonet is a Canadian of Spanish decent, born in Barcelona Spain in 1958. Growing up in an artistic family, Bonet was encouraged to study painting and sculpture with his parents who themselves were prominent artists in Spain during the 70’s.

Bonet was drawn immediately to painting, but incorporated much of the sculptural elements that he had learned into the composition of his works. Some critics interpret his art as a paradigm between beauty and ugliness, others as a series of mythical symbols and styles.

It is no question that Bonet’s paintings are dynamic, they work with the human body and the various layers surrounding the human spirit. We cannot help but feel enchanted by the bold colours and texture he uses to drape over each subject with an incomparable depth and richness. 

 

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Nathalie Voisine: Artist to Collect

Nathalie Voisine: Artist to Collect

                                                                                              Nathalie Voisine. Brume ou mirage. Acrylic on Canvas. 22x28". 

 

This month we pick contemporary Quebec painter Nathalie Voisine as an Artist to Collect. 

“I let the forms appear. From the pitted textures of the canvases and transparency of paints, a character is born. My imaginations and emotions guide my colourful creations.” - Nathalie Voisine

Nathalie Voisine paints in a distinct style: saturated colours, gestural brush strokes, figurative portraits that border abstraction. 

Born in Québec, Voisine studied at Sainte-Hélène de Kamouraska. Upon graduating, she moved from urban Québec City to rural Baie-Saint-Laurent where she continues to feel connected with nature; the trees, the grass, the rivers, the sky. Fueling her passion, nature continues to inspire her work.

Nature is not the only source of Voisine’s inspiration. Her unique style originates first from imagination. She begins many of her work with a single gesture, from her imagination. She determines her subject as soon as her imagination meets colour.

“My creative process, beginning with simple random movements across the canvas, without the subject being determined in advance under the impulse takes life with a stroke of a color or movement.”

Voisine received an honour of recognition at Rêves d’Automne in Baie-Saint-Paul in 2012. Voisine had her first major solo in 2014 at the Musée regional de Kamouraska. Entitled, A History To Watch, the exhibition showcased 17 of Voisine’s paintings: landscapes and subjects from Kamouraska history.

“I leave forms apparaîtrent, vibration background, textures punctuated transparency, are often up to the birth of a character, to create an emotion in my colourful imagination.”

Visit our Q collections Tab on the website and view our online collection for an in depth look at this contemporary Quebec artist.  

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Magical Realism: Guy Paquet

Magical Realism: Guy Paquet

                                                                                                         Guy Paquet. Untitled. 38x40". Oil on Canvas. 

 

“When I am far from my colors, far from the smells of the studio, then I want to be there to find this world of pleasure where my fantasies, my memories, this mixture of past and present are. I scaffold these images embroidered with sensations, atmosphere and thoughts.” – Guy Paquet

There is a mysterious and intriguing quality to Guy Paquet’s landscapes.

It is almost as though you were a child looking up at the stars and witnessing them for the first time. Paquet recreates this sensation of wonder through paint. Born in Quebec City in 1949, Paquet was always fascinated by the way people would inhabit spaces. As a self taught artist, he sought to capture the beauty that surrounded him on canvas. His paintings evolved into stunning landscapes which encompassed the mysticism of space and his deep love for the outdoors.

Influenced largely by Quebec artist Jean-Paul Lemieux, Paquet adapted his own style and treatment of landscape called magical realism. Finding comfort in Lemieux’s seemingly infinite Landscapes, Paquet wanted to evoke that same sense of mystery. His career as a painter developed naturally, beginning with small local shows and hometown galleries. As his artwork became more recognized, Paquet started exhibiting in galleries all across Montreal and internationally to Paris. For over 30 years, Paquet’s style remained constant. Today, he is considered among one of the top contemporary masters of the 20th century.

As he continues to paint, we continue to be captivated by the way he follows the light and its movements. Art had always been a way for Paquet to express the vastness of space and the passage of time. 

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Treasures from the Q Collection: Fernand Toupin and Les Plasticiens

 

                                                                     

  Fernand Toupin. Crème. Mixed Media on Canvas. 7.8x10.6".  

Recently brought in from our permanent collections storage, Crème by RCA artist Fernand Toupin (1930-2009) represents an important chapter in the conceptual evolution of Canadian painting. Distinct with a flat expanse of white paint set in contrast to a thick textural application, this work embodies the character of a generation of painters who aspired to rid their medium of any vestiges of visual reality.

Born in Montréal, Toupin is best known for his involvement with the Canadian non-figurative painting movement known as the Plasticiens. With fellow members Rodolphe de Repentigny (1926-59), Louis Belzile (b.1929), and Jean-Paul Jérôme (1928-2004), the Plasticiens above all valued the plastic facts of painting: tone, texture, form, line, and overall unity. They renounced the romantic conception of painting as a form of self-expression and instead, sought to accentuate the objectivity of the canvas. For them, a painting was to be perceived as an autonomous object rather than a believable window onto the world.

The Plasticiens' work presented a reaction and alternative to the work of the earlier Automatiste movement. While both groups wanted to highlight the objectivity of their paintings, the Plasticiens opted towards more rigorous traditions of geometric abstraction, as opposed to the chance-based method of the Automatistes. Instead of allowing the unconscious mind to dictate the art-making process, the Plasticiens exerted an orderly control over the formal elements of painting. Their work was built by balancing one structural part against another in pursuit of compositional balance and equilibrium.

The paintings and writings of the Plasticiens helped to shape Montréal’s future as a centre in which geometric abstraction would find its fullest expression and theoretical justification. With their contribution, the groundwork was laid for more formalist abstraction to take hold by the 1960s.

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René Richard: A Testimonial of Solitude

René Richard: A Testimonial of Solitude

( R.C.A.) René Richard (1895 – 1982)

René Richard’s artistic style interlaces close natural observation, and personal experience
as a way to poeticize his sensibility towards the land.

During his long trips up North in pursuit of solitude, Richard was never one to fully reject civilization nor effusively embrace wilderness. It was the state of in-between that Richard felt most comfortable, a state which allowed him the space for contemplation and the freedom to create. Richard would paint lively, colorful landscapes that danced between figurative and abstract, calling upon sensation rather than imitation.

Richard was a Swiss-born Canadian painter who settled in Canada with his family in 1909. Determined to learn the art and technique of painting, he took his first formal art lesson in Edmonton, Alberta. No soon after did he leave in 1927 to study full time in Paris, France.

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Painting the Landscape from 16th Century to Modern day

Painting the Landscape from 16th Century to Modern day

Artistic representations of the vast Canadian landscape have held a special fondness in the hearts of Canadians since early European contact. The tradition has been so enduring that even after several hundred years, landscape painting is still as intrinsic to the identify of Canada as it has ever been. While modes of representation have changed drastically, the landscape genre has continued to hold a dominant place in the Canadian art market coast to coast. So what are the roots of this tradition and why has it been so pervasive throughout Canada’s past?

The first European representations of the land in Canada were completed by topographers of the British army. Under an imperial Britain with ambitions of territorial conquest, artists produced glorified images of explorations and the process of settlement against the background of an ever-present wilderness. Through the documentation and presentation of the Canadian landscape, Europeans were laying claim to the land and legitimizing their exploration and possession of North American territories. In the eyes of an imperial audience back home, the land was an unexploited resource, ripe for conquest and colonization.

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Canada’s Nation Builder's Series

Canada’s Nation Builder's Series

Artist Susan Statham chosen for Canada’s Nation Builders Series sponsored by Galerie Q

Galerie Q celebrates Canada with ʻNation Buildersʼ- a series of unique and inspiring paintings by award winning artist and author Susan Statham. The first instalment begins with a tribute to Canada’s seventh Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier (1841-1919) whose historical significance and contribution to Canada during his time as prime minister is included as an integral part of the continuation of this project series.

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Making Art Buying Accessible: Galerie Q Paintings Under $1000 Show

Making Art Buying Accessible: Galerie Q Paintings Under $1000 Show

When Robert and Signe McMichael purchased “Montreal River” by Lawren Harris in 1955, they paid just $250 for it. This was their first acquisition and since they could not afford that large sum, they paid for it in installments of $50 per month. While the couple was not exceedingly wealthy, they were true lovers of art and found a way to turn their dreams of owning a premier art collection into reality.

So why is original artwork so important?

Art critic Walter Benjamin once wrote “even the most perfect reproduction of a work of art is lacking in one element: its presence in time and space, its unique existence at the place where it happens to be.” Benjamin was concerned with authenticity, he believed that original works had a certain aura, something intrinsically linked to the artist and the materiality of paint and brush. Which is to say, that there is something invaluable about owning an original artwork, it is the ability to experience a painting in real time, as the artist had intended.

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A Brief History of Native Canadian Art

A Brief History of Native Canadian Art

A critical way to enrich anyoneʼs understanding of Aboriginal arts is to go out and experience them!

--   France Trépanier & Chris Creighton-Kelly

Canadian art history began far before any settler put paint to brush. It began out of communication and necessity from the widespread and diverse Native peoples who had no word or concept for “art”. Art was created to enhance practical things like ceremonial dress, clothing, drums and shelter, and pipes. Markings on rock faces told stories and bore tribal identifiers. Carvings, beadings, weavings, and painted markings all served purposes—decoration was always also functional. Unlike the Europeans settlers who had a long history of enjoying art for art’s sake, the creation of beautiful things in Native Canadian communities was secondary to the creation of functional things.

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